A New Discovery? Brenner Lunar X

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Apollo XX
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A New Discovery? Brenner Lunar X

Unread post by Apollo XX » Fri Jun 30, 2017 5:47 pm

On the same night that I did the July LVAS/M14 Challenge I was out earlier looking at the moon and Jupiter as the scope cooled down and I waited for darkness. Anyone who has spent any significant time with the moon is aware of the seemingly endless patterns that can be discerned as the light and shadows plays across the lunar surface. Some of these are quite famous, such as the Straight Wall, the Cobra Head, and the Lunar X at Crater Werner. Then there are those that are more transient and less famous - "O'neill's Bridge is one that comes to mind - but even when you come across them you can usually find a reference to their existence somewhere. Most of what we see has been seen before.

Well, I saw something on the moon on Wednesday evening that I'm not sure anyone else has seen. I couldn't find any reference to what I saw anywhere, so I'm calling it the Lunar X at Crater Brenner. Compared to the Lunar X at Crater Werner, my X is very fine-lined. At the same time it was very vivid, and less transient than the better known X, which has a very short viewability span when it is visible. I was so intrigued by this feature that I went and got my moon map and drew it right on there.

My Lunar X is both bigger and thinner-lined than the well-known X at Werner. Here's a picture of my map after I drew the lines on it at the eyepiece;

Image

Using the Virtual Moon Atlas I've marked the area of the feature and the biggest crater it intersects. You can see the ridges very faintly if you look hard enough. The sun was at just the right angle to highlight the ridges and darken the western sides of them;

Image

The key to seeing features on the moon, especially transient ones, is in duplication the conditions, especially phase and librations. I'll be watching for future opportunities to confirm the viewability of this new feature;

Image

For reference, here's what the Luna X at crater Werner looks like, and to the north of it is the "V" as well;

Image
Mike M.
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Pete
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Re: A New Discovery?

Unread post by Pete » Mon Jul 03, 2017 12:04 pm

Super neat find Mike. Wonder indeed how many folks have picked up on this.

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Re: A New Discovery?

Unread post by Stargrrl » Thu Aug 10, 2017 4:31 pm

Mike - intriguing. I checked my moon books, the X is clearly visible in a photo in Wood's Modern Moon, but he doesn't discuss it per se (only the nearby Rheita Valley). In Rukl's Atlas the perspective doesn't lend itself to showing a clear X.

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